Category Archives: Family

Stories of the impact my ancetors are having today; interesting stories of convergences and circles being closed.

Happy Birthday Mom – A Love Letter

love letter

With long life will I satisfy him, and show him my salvation. – Psalms 91:16

 And the Lord said, My spirit shall not always strive with man, for that he also is flesh: yet his days shall be an hundred and twenty years.  Genesis 6:3
I write a bit about my paternal DNA, the connection I have with my dad through:
  • aviation
  • my mechanical bent
  • and writing
I am aware I do not write about my mother, unless it it is in reference to her family ancestors, the Rightmeiers.  This has nothing to do with a preference for my dad over my mom but purely out of respect for her privacy.  Mom is still alive and well.  Dad passed on in March 2000.  I endeavor to be respectful of all of my family, living or not, but also know that privacy for those still living is another facet of respect.
Birthday’s Are For A  Love Letter
I am making an exception with this post.  My mother’s birthday is in the month of February and I want to honor her.  She is in her 80s and just as beautiful as ever.  She is alert, strong and active.  I am grateful to have her DNA woven into mine.   If I got my sense of adventure from Dad, Mom taught me how to prepare and plan.  Mom imparted to me great organization skills which have served me well from housekeeping to organizing air traffic. She instilled in me not just the sense of beauty but how to bring it into reality – on a budget. If Daddy was a visionary, mom made it happen.
A Trip To Remember And A Daily Love Letter
A trip we took to Seattle for a family wedding comes to mind.  My father was to walk his youngest sister down the aisle.  I was five or six, my next sister around two and my youngest at the time a baby.  We were driving.  Two days up, two days back and a few days on site for the wedding.  I was the ring bearer or flower girl and I think my younger sister was the other.  Details escape me, but I do remember this:

Continue reading Happy Birthday Mom – A Love Letter

The Kodiak – See You On The Other Side

“See you on the other side”.   A closing salutation in an e-mail  from a missionary anticipating my arrival in Indonesia.

In the post My Journey Into Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) I mentioned touring

Kodiak
Our First Meeting in Nampa June 2016

their headquarters in Nampa, ID and attending an MAF event at the airport in Wichita.  During both of these occasions I was introduced to the Quest Kodiak airplane being incorporated into their fleet.  Little did I know this particular Kodiak would precede me on an unexpected journey.

The Kodiak by Quest Aviation can take off in 800 ft. with 7,500 lbs gross weight was developed specifically for the unique needs of mission aviation. 

Kodiak First Flight
The MAF event in Wichita was a “cold call” for me.  I knew none of the other local  supporters. At the event,  I had a warm conversation with the President and CEO, John Boyd who  queried me about my relationship with aviation in general and MAF specifically.  I gave the short version of my bio to which he responded, in a lovely accent “Nancy you would so enjoy volunteering in the hangar at MAF”.

I knew that would be the case, but in all honesty, Nampa, just outside Boise, ID is not on the way to anywhere and was not, at the time, on my list of places to go this year.  Yet, the desire got stuck in my soul and I got to take a flight in the Kodiak.  I suppose it watered the seed that had been planted many years before.

 At Wichita Eisenhower Airport
The Kodiak Calls
A short time later, I discovered that My mother, her brother and their spouses were going to attend an annual Idaho Rightmeier family picnic in August.  i was invited as well.  I realized I might be able to bundle these two worthy events into one trip. I applied to be an MAF volunteer, was approved to work in the fabrication shop, booked my tickets and headed northwest.
The week at the fabrication shop hit a chord in my soul I was unaware existed.  It hearkened back to the days I spent at the family auto parts, machine shop, salvage yard – except with airplane parts.  Of course Daddy had his EAA Bi-plane project setting in the shop as well, which he worked on as he could, so even that felt familiar.
Being a new kid on the fabrication block, I was eased into various odd projects:
  • putting boxes of shipping records into order
  • sorting airplane parts into their bins and updating their locations on spreadsheets
  • parkerizing and oiling parts for the Kodiak Oleo strut repair kit
  • sanding and oiling boxes for those parts to go in
  • bead blasting parts
  • powder coating custom prop hub tools. (I want one of these machines!)
  • and cutting vinyl to be made into pitot tube covers.
It was energizing!  I also got a second flight in the Kodiak.  This time, we headed for the hills of Idaho and I got to see just how remarkable this airplane is on 12% plus grades and really short take offs and landings.
MAF Advocacy
During the week, one of the shop overseers set me up to visit with the Advocate Wing Coordinator.  It had been suggested to me before to consider being an advocate, but the timing was not right.  Now it was.  Becoming an advocate is a process.  There is training, an interview and even a test in the form of a practice presentation that is recorded and sent in.

On the other hand, the support and materials provided an advocate is  just as professional as every other part of this organization.  I began setting up opportunities to speak right away along with my fellow local wing members.  This was going to be an awesome year.

But wait there is more!
I had just scheduled my first presentation at my local church and had a second one scheduled a week later at a school.  I had begun to make contact for other possible opportunities to speak, but life goes on, so I turned my attention to another need – grocery shopping.  As I was grabbing things off the bread shelf at Walmart, my phone rang.  It was MAF with a request so out of the blue, it took my breath away.
Gasp!
“Hi this is Tim.  We met in Nampa in the break room.  Your name came up in a conversation today.  We need someone to help with the aircraft parts inventory conversion at our base in Indonesia and wonder if you could help”.  (long pause while I process the questions racing through my brain).  Tim goes on to explain what is needed and why my name came up.  I am thinking:
  • passport – check
  • immunizations – check
  • calendar – flexible
After answering a few preliminary questions, I said, “I can’t think of a reason to say no”!  Details needed to be sorted out as to timing, visa and a consultation with  my spouse, but I left Walmart  headed to Sentani, Papua Indonesia.  Gasp! What will husband think? I sent him text.  No Response.  Hummm.  Head spinning, I drove home.  My husband came out of the house grinning from ear to ear.  I knew he was on-board.  So preparations began. I had asked for two things in the timing:
  • First. that the trip not interfere with Thanksgiving.  My family had planned a large gathering this year. and my mother was adamant that David and I BOTH be there.
  • Second, that I be home in time for our 40th Wedding Anniversary December 17.
The Kodiak Leads
kodiak
The Kodiak as she undergoes her transition to Indonesian citizenship at the Sentani MAF Base

I left the day after Thanksgiving and returned at 10 PM the night before our special day.  Three weeks and two days with a lifetime of experiences, including my 64th birthday  (what a neat gift).

During my orientation, as we toured the hangar I was greeted by an old friend: the Kodiak I had first seen during my tour of headquarters in June of 2016 and first flew in Wichita.  The same one I flew in a year later during my volunteer week.  There she was with her new Indonesian name:  PK-MEK, undergoing certification for her mission in her new home.
kodiakThere are several posts centering on this trip.  They fall under the “Flight” category of my Stonebridge.
My time and work in Indonesia pulled from multiple aspects of my life skills. God infused skills.  It is stunning how God does this, if we allow Him access.  Oh the adventures!

A Journey Into Mission Aviation Fellowship

journey

In June of 2016 on a return trip to Kansas from a family gathering in Moscow, ID, we took time to stop at the headquarters of Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) in Nampa, ID. We have been supporters of MAF for over 25 years, but my journey with this organization goes back much further.

The Paternal Connection

After our visit, I began to reflect exactly how far back this journey goes. In fact, it reaches back to my father. In the process of writing a book about my father’s interaction with short term mission trips in Costa Rica, I recalled that when daddy became a pilot, he looked into becoming a missionary pilot. He loved flying and wanted to serve using this passion and new skills. Daddy was also a really good mechanic. He had an instinct for getting things to work.

It seemed a perfect fit, but was not to be. Before finding out what all was involved, he thought that there might be a way to do short term flying missions, but aviation mission does not have a provision for short term pilots. In addition, he was not:

  • a certified air frame and power-plant aircraft mechanic,
  • nor a certified flight instructor
  • or did he possess a license for instrument flying,

all requirements to serve on the MAF aviation team. Daddy found another way to serve in short term missions but, as a result of our conversations, the seed of aviation as a mission tool was planted.

Even Earlier

I had heard of the story of Nate Saint, Jim Elliott, Peter Fleming, Roger Youderian, and Ed McCully who were martyred in Ecuador in 1956.  I was just three years old. Their stories are told in many different publications, books and even films. There are links to a few in this BLOG, but a google search will bring up many more. No matter your world view, it is worth your while to become acquainted with both the event that resulted in the death of these fine men, as well as the redemptive aspects of the after stories that continue to unfold, even today. It is remarkable.

A Woman Gets It Going…..

Another aspect of mission avaition’s beginnings is the fact that it was a woman, Betty Greene, who flew the first MAF mission. She had served during WWII in as a Women Air Force Service Pilot (WASP) and opened up regions for MAF to serve particularity in Peru and Indonesia. As a woman pilot, I cannot help but gasp in wonder at her courage, skill and dedication.

The Personal Connect Begins

My personal interaction with MAF took on a more direct line in 1993. It was that August I was privileged to be one of four United State Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) technical technical experts selected to journey to the country of Madagascar. We were to conduct an assessment of their civil aviation system. I went as the air traffic expert, along with experts in the areas of:

  • airport operations,
  • aircraft airworthiness
  • aircraft operations.

It was a two week  assignment.

As we began to ask the questions required in order to complete the assignment, we had the sense that we were not getting the entire picture. So we headed to the airport to ask the folks that used the system for their perspective: the pilots and mechanics. We talked informally with airline and general aviation folks.

Included in this group were some of the MAF pilots who flew to the remotest parts of this island nation, in many cases, in response to life and death situations. It was through this contact that I became acquainted with and supporters of one of the missionary pilot families posted there. With this connection we received regular updates and information of the work done around the world by this organization.

Backstories Continue

In the 1990s, MAF celebrated their 50 year anniversary as an organization. A wonderful book outlining the history of MAF was published and I read it. Wow. Through reading this I received an even wider and deeper view of this work. This included the strong connection with the Cessna Aircraft Company based in Wichita, Kansas.

Then in 2005, the movie “End of the Spear” was released.   It tells the story of Nate Saint and the others who sacrificed their lives while serving in Equador.  Because of my reading the history of MAF, we made a point to see the movie.

I stayed in touch with the pilots we supported. They came to Wichita to visit once. During their visit they put me in touch with an MAF advocate in the area and we got acquainted as well. Pilots love to compare stories, and I am no exception, but when chatting with these folks I listen. Nothing I have ever done in aviation is even worth mentioning next to what these pilots do – and, I might add, with an awesome safety record. These are not bush pilots, these are professional pilots who happen to do a lot of flying in the bush.

Aviation Safety

Because of MAF’s aviation core, it is unavoidably involved with the FAA, particularly the regulatory and certification side. Although I was not a part of the FAA regulatory world, I was drawn to the reality that MAF, from its start gave safety the utmost place in their strategy.

This was made very clear to me as I listened to the the audio version of book, Jungle Pilot. This work is compiled from the letters that Nate Saint wrote from Shell Mara in Equator.  His letters are filled with a passion to serve but always with an eye on mitigating the risk encountered daily.  These were pilots in the military during WWII.   They brought with them the training, skills and instinct for flying in high risk situations, yet doing all they could to manage risk. That core continues in the organization today.

And The Journey Continues….

In all my interactions with MAF, I am moved by the love, humility and professionalism with which they serve.  The mission statement of MAF, countless stories and testimonials on their web site speaks better than this space allows.

As we toured the MAF Headquarters, these connections, and intersections with MAF came flooding back to me. In my Stonebridge, MAF is a part of my faith, family and flight stones. It connects to my past, present and yes, future. On the latter, things have accelerated significantly. To find how how that acceleration landed me in Sentani Indonesia, you will have to read coming posts.

Indonesia

Things I Did Not Know About Indonesia

Indonesia

I recently was given a great gift through the opportunity to serve on a project in the country of Indonesia, specifically the Provence of Papua.  The opportunity came up very fast and aside from a few minor logistical items, most of which were taken care of for me by the sponsoring organization, I was on my way in a matter of a few weeks.

I knew little or nothing about this island nation on the other side of the planet.  I barely knew how to get there.  (head to Australia and stop short….).  As I made preparations to leave, there were many questions, but I knew from past travels there are just a few essentials one needs to have and know in order to go.  The sponsoring organization has many years in this location, so I trusted they would take care of me.

Needful Preparations
On the other hand, I wanted to be prepared so as not to be a burden.  I wanted to arrive as part of the team.  Fortunately, I am married to the consummate researcher.  My husband would rather research anything over almost any other activity in life.  I am not exaggerating….!
So, as I took care of the practical aspects of my departure such as what:
  • clothes to take (hot, humid, tropical)?
  • laundry facilities would there be?
  • medicines to carry with me (malaria and dengue fever – gulp)
  • would access to connectivity be? Computer, iPhone needed?

as well as,

  • Paying bills
  • stocking the pantry ahead
  • and scheduling BLOG and Facebook posts through the end of the year.
 We also took time to do our annual legacy file review:  wills, power of attorneys and monthly budget procedures.  We do this every year and this trip seemed a prudent time to get it done.
Useful Indonesia Information
In the midst of this, Hubby was glued to his computer looking up facts, information and curious tidbits about my destination.  At the moment, these bits of information were the last thing on my mind, but I have come to learn after 40 years of marriage, that however out of time, his research comes in handy – eventually.
Here are some things I did not know about this fourth populous nation of the earth:
  • It is the largest island nation on earth with over 13,000 islands forming the archipelago.  Most are uninhabited.  By the way, most island nations are the tops of volcanoes, both dead and alive, and the remains of ocean floors pushed up from volcanic activity.  Earthquakes and tremors were normal.
  • It’s land mass is 1/5th of the United States, however, when overlay-ed the USA, it stretches on the diagonal from Oregon to Florida.
  • The Republic of Indonesia is also the Spice Islands.  Cloves, Nutmeg, Cinnamon, Star anise, turmeric to name a few, have been sought after and traded for since ships and caravans found their way from Europe.  Remember the brand of spices your mother used to buy:  Spice Islands!
  • They drive on the left side of the road, right hand drive.  This goes back to the Dutch Colonial days when they also drove on the “other” side of the road.  The Dutch changed in the early 1900’s but Indonesia remained Right hand drive to conform with much of their region including Australia and Southeast Asia.  I had to resurrect my London days of “Look right” before crossing roads to avoid angry beeps from the herds of scooters!
  • The Sumatra and Java Coffee I drink at Starbucks come from Indonesia.
A Personal Connection

My father-in-law was stationed at Morotai on the Island of Maluku during WWII.  He flew P-38 reconnaissance at the end of the war and was all over the Pacific Theater in his career.  It was not until this trip that his time in Morotai came alive.  I did not visit there – it would have been like visiting Idaho while in Kansas, but still I am the one family member to get this close.

A Small Part of Indonesia
My exposure to Indonesia was very limited given its size.  The airport at Jakarta on the Island of Java and Sentani-Jayapura on the Indonesian side of the Island of Papua. I discovered the huge part this region played in the Pacific aspects of WWII.  I read several books during my trip (25 hours in the air each way gives one a lot of uninterrupted reading time).
While there, I was loaned a copy of Lost in Shangri-la by  Mitchell Zuckoff .  While telling the remarkable story of the discovery of the lost Dani tribe, it also provided a wealth of information on the role this strategic spot played during this time, the region’s history and the history of its people.
  • The Sentani Airport was built by the Japanese, then taken over by the US and allied forces.
  • General MacArthur was headquartered there and today remains an Indonesian military compound that contain artifacts of his time there.
  • There are virtually no roads to the interior of this island.  Wamena, is the world’s largest city is supplied only by aviation.
  • There are over 800 languages on the island of Papua alone.  The national language, Bahasa Indonesian, was adopted in the 1930s.   Its’ written form came into being over the previous 100 or so years during the Dutch colonial days.  In 1945 it was adopted as the national language in the constitution.  Most Indonesians are fluent in one or more of the other languages and speak a different language in the home.
Learning How Much There Is to Learn
All of this served as a humble reminder of how self-centric we are naturally.  I felt the sting, more than once, of my own ignorance of such a significant region as I learned more and more about the context in which my service would take place.  Yet, I did not scratch the surface of this remarkable place:  Bali, Kalimatran, Sumatra, Java, and much much more.
In the coming weeks, I will be sharing aspects of faith, family, and flight which  converged  into this unexpected assignment.   As we identify, build, shore-up and realize the stones in our unique Stonebridge of life, the history, back-story and context serve to add color, depth, hue, shades and over-all meaning to what appears on the surface.  Here’s to digging deep in 2018.
Name one event or experience that helped define your Stonebridge in 2017?  Please share in the comments below and don’t forget to subscribe!  I love hearing from you!

2017 Letter To Friends And Family – The Black and White Box

“A box without hinges, key, or lid, yet golden treasure inside is hid.” – J.R.R. Tolkien
I have a pretty black and white box I bought for my husband’s 60th birthday celebration.  It was used to gather all  of the “60-Words of blessing” that folks sent.  Those now have been placed into an archive for someone, someday to deal with.

box

The black and white box has become our annual memory box.  A place where I gather the mementos we acquire throughout the year like:
  • programs from concerts
  • graduation invites and programs
  • wedding, death and baptism announcements
  • and other like events
During the holidays we open the box and review the people we have met, the occasions we celebrate, even the good-bye’s said.  These serve as precious reminders.  It gives us a place from which to launch gratitude for another year and to reflect on how we will go forward in the new year.
A Box Of News
This box, along with photos and our planners are the source for the news in our annual letters.  We have been sending out annual news since we were married 40 years ago.  I have copies of them all.  They are a compilation of adventures taken, goals met and joys shared. Behind many of those are days of long hours, fears pressing in and yes, sorrows walked through.   Last year was the first time I used THE STONEBRIDGE platform to share this.
There are times I look at what we have done, and am reluctant continue this tradition.  Social Media has made it possible to stay in touch with the many global friends we have, as well as family well beyond those we send cards and letters.  And frankly things seemed to have become a routine.  I am just fine with that.
Yet, there is something special about sharing news this time of year.  I know we enjoy the annual missives we get from others, whether via print or the Internet.   We add those to our “box” for our year end review.  We trust you enjoy ours as well.
Highlights from 2017

Continue reading 2017 Letter To Friends And Family – The Black and White Box

Giving A Voice To The Voiceless – The Christmas Shepherds

The one thing that you have that nobody else has is you. Your voice, your mind, your story, your vision. So write and draw and build and play and dance and live as only you can. – Neil Gaiman

voiceThe story of the nativity would be incomplete without the shepherds “keeping watch over their flocks by night”.  They were the first to hear the announcement, beyond the immediate family, that something extraordinary had occurred.   A very special baby boy had been born.

I have heard this story for as long as I can remember.  As a child we read the Christmas story in our home every Christmas Eve, heard it at church and even reenacted it as a drama to the best of our ability.  But who were these men?  Why shepherds?

Without A Voice
Shepherds have an ebb and flow of status in the Bible.  In the early days of the Patriarchs they held an important place.  Abraham, Isaac and Jacob (renamed Israel) were all nomadic and owned large herds and flocks.  Along with provision and lively hood, these were a sign of wealth of the day.  However, their neighbors, the Egyptians, did not hold shepherds in high regard at all, and when Israel devolved into slave status in Egypt, it seems this attitude toward shepherding remained with them even after their exodus.
The Shepherd Psalmist King’s Voice
Still there were shepherds.  In the time of David, he was found tending sheep when anointed to the King.  The fact that he was the youngest and his station in the family not highly regarded, indicates the low status of those who tended these woolly necessary creatures.  As David rose to Kingship, so did the status of the shepherd for a time.
However, at the time of the birth of Jesus,  shepherds were regarded about the same as the tax collector (think IRS).  They were not allowed to even speak in a court of law.  They had no voice.  The particular shepherds on that special night, were tending the flocks for the temple.  These were the sheep used in the daily required temple sacrifice.  One would think they would have some kind of status, but apparently not.
A Voice Is Who We Are

Continue reading Giving A Voice To The Voiceless – The Christmas Shepherds

Thanksgiving Thoughts From Maison Steinbuchel

Thanksgiving is an emotional holiday. People travel thousands of miles to be with people they only see once a year. And then discover once a year is way too often. – Johnny Carson

The day before Thanksgiving is the heaviest travel day of the year.  This true of all modes of transportation, but none more filled with tension than air travel.  During my years in air traffic I worked many of these days.  From the inside, it was serious business.  I arrived to take my position at the radar in the Los Angeles Center with coffee at hand, my mind focused and with a bit of apprehension for the task at hand.  It was fun and awesome at the same time.

Those days were also days of honor, where I could serve the travelers of this nation, even the world, so they could get home to be with family and loved ones.  I was aware of what was at stake:

  • hugs and tears of welcome
  • reminiscence with family and friends
  • reminders of those no longer with us
  • grandparents seeing grandchildren, perhaps for the first time
  •  And even some reluctant endurance of bad memories

Whatever awaited at the end of each passenger’s voyage, we did our best (really) to not add to the stress of the travel.

Sending Thanksgiving Peace

Today, I have to admit, I don’t miss the tension and stress.  Yet, neither do I regret having served in this way.  As I said, it was and honor.

The video above is sent to provide you a moment of peace, respite or even escape, if needed.   The Music is from David Cullen – not the one I am married to.

So from Maison Steinbuchel we sent our warmest prayers for a day filled with peace, good food, and fellowship, wherever you may be.  For those serving our country in the military,  public safety, air traffic or any other civil service, we send our thanks.  thanksgiving

If you are serving in some way away from friends and family, please let me know in the comments below.  I want to thank you personally.   If not, where will you spend your Thanksgiving this year?

Happy And Blessed Thanksgiving – Practicing Gratitude

“Do not spoil what you have by desiring what you have not; remember that what you now have was once among the things you only hoped for.”  ― Epicurus

gratitudeI am writing this several weeks before it will post.  It has been a gloomy few days and even though I hate to admit it, my grumpy level goes up when the sun hides.  This tends to press my gratitude level down.  I would not do well in Alaska in winter.

So I decided to go ahead and do a Thanksgiving post.  Thanksgiving was our extended maternal family’s reunion gathering as a child.  We usually went to the farm where all the traditional comfort food converged from a eight county area onto one table.  If there were strained relationships they were set aside for the day as far as I could tell.

This breaking of bread among family served us well.  I only remember the laughter, the stories (that got bigger each year) and the fellowship.  It was expressed gratitude that we had family.  I know it was far from perfect, but even in that, I learned gratitude in the face of the imperfect.  I learned that one does not depend on the other.

Choosing Gratitude

So today I am revving up my gratitude meter.  This year, we are gathering the extended family at my aunt and uncle’s home.  Not on the farm this time, but the family will be there.  Things are far from perfect.  In fact, there are some real challenges many of us are facing, but we still have much much to be thankful for.

Here is a start.  I apologize up front if my list seems superficial to some who may read this in much worse situations, but here I go.  I am grateful for:

  • hot and cold running water
  • several modes of reliable transportation
  • heat, gas and electricity
  • a warm, clean bed
  • a washer and dryer and clean clothes
  • for a loving husband of almost 40 years
  • for a loving church family and friends in several languages around the globe
  • hopes, dreams and plans that my Lord superintends on my behalf
  • ……????

Now, it’s your turn.  In the comments put one (or more) thing you are grateful for.   Let’s see how far this can go.

And oh yes, if you are traveling, safe journeys!

 

 

How Martin Luther Affected All Of Our Destinies – A Tribute

We do not become righteous by doing righteous deed but, having been made righteous, we do righteous deeds.  Martin Luther

I am not a Lutheran.  Although I appreciate much of their theology, I attended a Methodist Church growing up.   A movement that grew out of the Anglican church and although much removed from its roots – the tree does flow back into the Roman Catholic faith.  However, there is no disputing the effect the reformation had on both the faith of my childhood as well as the path my German ancestors took.

Reformation Trickle-Down
In the mid 1860’s my great great grandfather and his brother, left Germany for the United States.  The conditions that created the need to leave home were a combination of religious and economic upheaval.   This led to a major shift in the social structure of the time.  There were some natural climatic cycles that also affected the food supply of the region.  A long standing backdrop to all of this was the protestant reformation which began about 350 years prior.  At the time my ancestors made their move, the effects of Martin Luther’s actions had all but crumbled the feudal system.
I have no doubt that once in the United States my ancestor clung closely to the German speaking community of immigrants as he made his way west to Kansas.  Once settled in Kansas, he became a part of the Methodist church as Lutherans were not a major part of the landscape in northern Kansas.  However, this could have been the influence of my great great grandmother as to what church they affiliated with.  I get the sense that he was a man of faith,  however tending to the land and ensuring his family was fed took priority over religious activities.  Still if it had not been for the Reformation, I am not sure what the time line would have looked like for my family.
Luther And A French Education

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dream-Home

Finding Lost Family Members – Or Not….

Research is what I’m doing when I don’t know what I’m doing – Wernher von Braun

In a post about a circa 1907 family reunion on the Rightmeier homestead in Jewelllost family County, Kansas, I mentioned a great great uncle, August, we had lost track of.  A friend who has a gift for finding lost family  on the Internet decided to poke around for me.  I was humbled that she took time to do this.

 I had found an 1880 census record of an August G. Rehtmeyer on Ancestry that put him working as a “clerk in a store” in  Pocahontas, Bond, Illinois.  He was 19.
What We Found On August G Rehtmeier
  • He voted in 1890 while living at 819 W North Avenue, Chicago, IL
  • On November 24, 1887 he married Catharine Goldenbogen in Chicago, IL.  Sir name spelled Rithmeyer on the marriage license.
  • 1900 US Census shows him in Chicago at that same location with a wife, Kate and three children, Neta
  • (Nettie) (11), Walter (8) and Florence (5) Sir name spelled Rehtmeyr and occupation as a furniture dealer
  • He and Kate took a ship while cited as being a resident of Chicago and he went to Hamburg, on the Hamburg-Amerika line, a Dampfschiff (steam ship)
  • 1908 He’s married and going from Hamburg through a French port to New York
  • September 12, 1912 He, Kate and the two girls takes the ship President Grant from Boulogne sur Mer France to New York
  • 1920 Census he and Kate are living in Los Angeles on 3008 West 7th Street in a rental. He is listed as a furniture merchant and employer. The building there today looks about a 1920’s stor
    efront. It is probable they lived above the store he ran. Name shown as AG Rehtmeyr
  • Then I see him going from Hawaii to LA on a ship 1923 and he’s living in LA on Olive St in 1926. He voted in CA as a Republican.
  • Two places have his death mentioned: Jan 6 1929, Los Angeles, CA at age 67. He’s buried at Forest Lawn Glendale. He was considered American on all the ships manifests.
Opps…

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